Mobility

We like the Phoenix Art Museum. It’s huge, which means lots of large open galleries, and both the permanent and the temporary exhibits are consistently interesting. We once found a display of Frank Lloyd-Wright designs that were never built (Frank had a lot of these). Another time it was an exhibit of Madeleine Albright’s brooches. That was more interesting than it sounds.

Our plan yesterday was simple; wander around and see what’s new and have lunch at the museum’s courtyard cafe. While wandering, I came across a small collection of small Alexander Calder works. Although these involve some balance, they are not “mobiles” because they do not hang from the ceiling.

And that was supposed to be that. But then I saw a few other pieces that I couldn’t resist including in the post.

The first caught my eye just because it’s very large and pretty. Who doesn’t like flowers, right? I should have had Mary Anne stand beside to give you a sense of scale.

This is a head made entirely of nails. You may have to enlarge the photo to fully appreciate it.

This very large piece was spectacular; vivid colors and very textured.

Another wall-sized piece with an almost three dimensional look. Notice the unreal use of shading, the two white rectangles compared to the red oval, for example.

This was from an exhibit of ‘60s political art.

More than I planned to say. I hope you found it interesting.

2 thoughts on “Mobility”

  1. Michelle Power

    Very interesting indeed!! Thanks for including us in your museum adventures – enjoy the warm weather and sunshine!!

  2. Michael Barnes

    Loved it! Loved them!
    I am becoming an “oversized art” enthusiast, myself.
    And that’s just driving into town on the Banfield.
    Vivid colors and spectacular . . . and all on a base of public concrete.
    We’ll see how they weather.
    (No Calder’s, though!)

    And . . . no admission charge, except the price of gas . . . . ;>} Love, MEB

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